KPS4Parents Produces Free 45-Minute Parent Training Video

We’ve been working hard over the summer to bring you new tools for this upcoming new school year. To kick things off, we’re giving parents a free 45-minute training video titled, “3 Critical Errors that Even the Smartest Parents of Children with Special Needs Can Make in the IEP Process.” Watch it now and you’ll also get links to additional resources, including a free IEP goal-writing template that you can use to prepare for your IEP meetings, as well as during the meetings when IEP goals are being formulated by the IEP team.

Best of luck in the new school year to all students and their families! We hope this tool is useful for many of you struggling to understand the IEP process and that the tools that we will continue to add to our parent education resources will help you as you continue to learn, as well.

The Approaching End of a Heartbreaking Era

Click here to listen to the podcast version of this blog post.


When the Education of All Handicapped Children’s Act (EAHCA) was enacted as PL94-142 in 1975, it was in the face of enormous opposition from school district administrators and their attorneys who were actively refusing to enroll children with disabilities in our nation’s public schools. Many have remained employed in public education, stewing in their own bile over their legal “loss” while begrudgingly enrolling students with special needs.

The EAHCA was reauthorized as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in 1990, which has, itself, been reauthorized twice since then, the last reauthorization being in 2004. Clearly, Congress has no intention of returning to a time when discriminating against those with disabilities was perfectly acceptable.

I don’t know how many of you have experienced an employment situation in which people have been required to do something that they opposed, but it’s been my experience that some people in this position are more likely to sabotage any attempts to do things differently to “prove” it was a bad idea than to willingly go with the program. Some people are just sore losers.

In short, you’re not likely to get buy-in from people who had to be Court-ordered or required by regulation to do the ethical and responsible thing. It says something, anyway, about a person’s character when he/she forgoes ethical solutions for whatever reasons and, therefore, requires enforceable regulations that dictate what his/her behavior should be. Some peoples’ characters create a situation in which the behaviors normally associated with common sense and ethics become subject to regulation.

This is not specific to special education or the legal practices that surround it. This is human nature. Somewhere out there in the world is the person who justified warning labels on suppositories that advise they are not meant for oral consumption. Some people’s functional skills in various aspects of life, for whatever reasons, are seriously limited.

People tend not to make improvements when forced to, particularly when they perceive the improvements as a threat to their familiar, comfortable, self-serving routines. This, too, is human nature.

The problem in special education is that, following the passage of the EAHCA, too many people with chips on their shoulders were left over the decades in positions of authority in public education, passing their “insight” onto the people they were responsible for training and stacking the deck against the success of special education. In other words, ever since the passage of the EAHCA in 1975, there have been career public education administrators undermining the effectiveness of special education in order to win an argument rather than educate children, the latter of which being what we actually pay them six-figure salaries at public expense to do.

Read the rest of this entry »

“The Kids Aren’t All Right” Infographic

This interactive infographic puts some key global information about child welfare at your fingertips. As we continue to push forward for appropriate educational outcomes for all children, it helps to understand the Macrosystem contexts in which our individual struggles occur.

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Welcome to Our Blog!

Welcome to Making Special Education Actually Work, the official blog of KPS4Parents. We sincerely hope that this blog proves to enlighten and empower all responsible adults to ensure that all children, regardless of disability, receive a Free and Appropriate Public Education.

Blog Author & Moderator:
KPS4Parents' CEO
Anne M. Zachry, MA


Special Education Lay Advocate, Paralegal, Education Researcher, Curriculum Developer

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Please note that all our postings on this blog are based on the knowledge and experience of our special education lay advocates and guest bloggers and are not to be construed as the legal advice of attorneys.

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"Your podcasts are awesome - I'm going through listening to a lot of them as I prepare for my daughter's annual IEP review this weekend. Besides the convenience of the podcasts, the most useful thing is that you have really important information that's new and not listed on 100 other websites. It's helpful to hear the concrete examples for when good intentions all around went wrong. And it's also helpful that you balance that out with reminders that a relationship needs to be maintained with the special ed administrators."
Amy N., California